Friday, 20 May 2022 00:00

Painful deformities, such as hammertoes, can be treated. Stop living with foot pain, and have beautiful feet again!

Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

Some people who are afflicted with arthritis  have found it beneficial to start a walking program. In addition to improving foot care, walking is good for maintaining heart health and strong bones. Additionally, weight loss is a benefit of walking, and this may help to lessen pressure on the joints of the feet. Research has shown that walking may help to reduce inflammation, pain, and stiffness from certain arthritic conditions. It is important to walk frequently, gradually increasing intensity and enforcing a minimum time limit of 30 minutes. Many people choose to split their walking mileage and time between days, and this can make it easier to stick with a walking program. If you would like more information about how walking can help arthritis, please consult with a podiatrist who can answer any questions you may have.

Arthritis can be a difficult condition to live with. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Tri-Town Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Arthritic Foot Care  

Arthritis is a term that is commonly used to describe joint pain.  The condition itself can occur to anyone of any age, race, or gender, and there are over 100 types of it.  Nevertheless, arthritis is more commonly found in women compared to men, and it is also more prevalent in those who are overweight. The causes of arthritis vary depending on which type of arthritis you have. Osteoarthritis for example, is often caused by injury, while rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a misdirected immune system.

Symptoms

  • Swelling
  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • Decreased Range of Motion

Arthritic symptoms range in severity, and they may come and go. Some symptoms stay the same for several years but could potentially get worse with time. Severe cases of arthritis can prevent its sufferers from performing daily activities and make walking difficult.

Risk Factors

  • Occupation – Occupations requiring repetitive knee movements have been linked to osteoarthritis
  • Obesity – Excess weight can contribute to osteoarthritis development
  • Infection – Microbial agents can infect the joints and trigger arthritis
  • Joint Injuries – Damage to joints may lead to osteoarthritis
  • Age – Risk increases with age
  • Gender –Most types are more common in women
  • Genetics – Arthritis can be hereditary

If you suspect your arthritis is affecting your feet, it is crucial that you see a podiatrist immediately. Your doctor will be able to address your specific case and help you decide which treatment method is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington, Canton, and Chelsea, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Care for Your Arthritic Foot
Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

It is common for diabetic patients to have poor circulation in their feet. This is often the result of elevated blood sugar levels. Neuropathy can accompany this. It can be difficult to feel cuts and wounds on the feet, and the blood vessels can diminish in size. There are several methods to help poor circulation in the feet. These can consist of getting regular foot examinations, monitoring glucose levels, and wearing diabetic socks. Research has indicated that performing specific exercises may improve circulation in the feet. Some exercises can include cardiovascular activity such as walking or biking for five days per week. Additionally, it is important to keep blood pressure at a normal level and refrain from walking barefoot. Foods that are rich in vitamin C may help to naturally thin the blood, and it may help to incorporate foods that are rich in fiber into your daily food plan. If your feet are affected by poor circulation, it is strongly suggested that you confer with a podiatrist who can help you to manage this condition. 

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of Tri-Town Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington, Canton, and Chelsea, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Tuesday, 03 May 2022 00:00

Parents who notice the skin surrounding their children's nails are red and tender may be aware that an ingrown toenail has developed. It is defined as a toenail that grows into the surrounding skin. It often happens as a result of toenails that are trimmed incorrectly, or from wearing shoes that do not fit properly. Additionally, children who participate in soccer activities can develop ingrown toenails from frequently kicking the ball. There could be considerable pain with an ingrown toenail, in addition to possible blisters. Parents can help their child find mild relief when the foot is soaked in warm water, and the nail is gently pushed away from the skin. If an infection develops, it is strongly advised that you speak with a podiatrist who can offer you the best treatment options for your child.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of Tri-Town Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington, Canton, and Chelsea, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care

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