Tuesday, 27 February 2024 00:00

Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, is a widespread, yet often overlooked vascular condition affecting millions of Americans. Despite its prevalence, PAD's symptoms can be subtle, leading to under-diagnosis. These symptoms can include pain in the calves during activity, numbness, tingling, and slow-healing sores on the legs or feet. Peripheral artery disease occurs due to the accumulation of plaque in the blood vessels, which restricts blood flow to the lower extremities. Individuals with diabetes face a heightened risk as sores or bruises may not heal properly, leading to the formation of ulcers on the feet and lower legs. Risk factors for PAD include a family history of heart disease and hypertension. High cholesterol, smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity may also be factors. If you believe you have symptoms of PAD, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who is medically trained to manage this condition.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Tri-Town Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington, Canton, and Chelsea, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 20 February 2024 00:00

Foot drop is a condition marked by having difficulty lifting or moving the foot and toes. The foot fails to lift properly, causing a gait that looks like marching. Foot drop typically stems from nerve injuries as the result of sports injuries, spinal issues like slipped discs, or neuropathies associated with conditions such as diabetes. Other causes of drop foot  include inherited conditions like Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or neurological disorders, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis. Treatment strategies for foot drop are multifaceted, depending on the underlying cause and severity of symptoms. Certain exercises can play an important role in strengthening and stretching muscles to improve function. In addition, braces, splints, or custom orthotics may offer external support and aid in maintaining proper foot positioning. In cases of permanent impairment, surgical joint fusion or nerve repair may be necessary. Electrical nerve stimulation devices also can offer promising therapeutic options, particularly for individuals affected by stroke or multiple sclerosis. If you have symptoms of foot drop, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an exam and diagnosis, followed by the appropriate treatment options. 

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Tri-Town Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington, Canton, and Chelsea, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about The Importance of Biomechanics in Podiatry
Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

Improper toenail trimming is a common culprit behind ingrown toenails, a painful condition that occurs when the nail grows into the surrounding skin. The risk of ingrown toenails increases when toenails are trimmed improperly. This includes when toenails are cut too short, rounded at the corners, or not trimmed straight across. To trim toenails correctly and reduce the likelihood of ingrowth, you should follow a few simple steps. Firstly, soften the nails by soaking the feet in warm water for a few minutes. Using sanitized nail clippers, cut the nails straight across, avoiding curved edges. Ensure that the nails remain slightly longer than the skin at the nail's edge. Digging the clippers into the corners of the nails, or trying to create a rounded shape, will increase your chances of developing ingrown toenails. Adopting these toenail-trimming practices will help you maintain healthy, pain-free feet. If you suspect ingrowth, it is suggested you seek an appointment with a podiatrist, who can help you treat ingrown toenails and provide more prevention tips. 

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of Tri-Town Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington, Canton, and Chelsea, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care
Sunday, 11 February 2024 00:00

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

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